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Nobel prize for physics goes to graphene researchers

Posted: 06 Oct 2010  Print Version  Bookmark and Share

Keywords:Nobel prize for physics 2010  Geim  Novoselov  graphene 

University of Manchester professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov won the 2010 Nobel prize for physics for their breakthrough work on graphene, which opens doors to terahertz transmission via graphene transistors as well as development of graphene-based ICs and highly sensitive sensors.

Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using regular adhesive tape, according to the Nobel organization. They were able to obtain a flake of carbon in the graphene form, which at the time, 2004, was thought to be unstable, unlike the fullerene C60 allotrope where the carbon sheet is wrapped up into ball.

 University of Manchester professors Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right) won the 2010 Nobel prize for physics for their breakthrough work on graphene

University of Manchester professors Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right) won the 2010 Nobel prize for physics for their breakthrough work on graphene.

However, graphene is the world�s thinnest material and is also the strongest, while being stiff and yet flexible and extremely good conductor of heat and electricity.

Electrons travel further in graphene than in any other material, opening up a range of electronic applications. These include: graphene transistors that could help communications technologies exploit the terahertz part of the electromagnetic spectrum; high performance graphene-based integrated circuits and toxin and pollution sensors that are more sensitive than those currently available.

Graphene is also suitable for use in touch screens and optical applications and holds out promise for the creation of thin, elastic, lightweight composite materials

Konstantin Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD-student in the Netherlands. He subsequently followed Geim to the United Kingdom. Both of them originally studied and began their careers as physicists in Russia.

Professor David Delpy, chief executive of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, said: "This work represents an enormously important scientific development; an exciting new material that has a huge range of applications and will no doubt bring significant benefits to the U.K. economy. EPSRC has been supporting research by Professor Geim and his group for nearly 10 years and our latest grant has enabled the U.K. to retain the key academic and research staff behind this discovery, who might otherwise have been lost to foreign institutions."

- Peter Clarke
EE Times





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